Monthly Archives: December 2011

Scientists like to link to things. To finish off the year, the things I’ve been linking to on various social media platforms: Disasters Biology Space Science Geoscience Science & Art

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Geoscience at YVR: domestic terminal

“The Sea-to-Sky Wall” is located in the domestic terminal of the Vancouver International Airport (YVR) domestic terminal. The accompanying signage is a delightful tribute to our local geology. The Garibaldi Golden Granite is a coarse-grained granodiorite, and part of the … Continue reading

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(non-disaster) Geoscience items I linked to on various social media platforms: It took getting stuck in the Terrace Airport for me to finally discover the Earth Science Picture of the Day Singing sand dunes, paired up with Martian sands in … Continue reading

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Space-science items I’ve linked to on social media recently: Cosmology Primer for your Beginning & End of the Universe needs. Constructive interference is the concept that brings you rogue waves, acoustic beats, seiche, and MoirĂ© patterns. Now do that in … Continue reading

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Biology(ish) items I’ve been linking to on various forms of social media recently: Dino-decorations and the Holiday Dino-tree Spider brains. I still vote that if your brain is so big it spills into your legs, then, still squished for space, … Continue reading

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Things I’ve recently linked to on various social media platforms, disasters edition: Using science to predict pedestrian behaviour is useful for planning evacuation routes. I’m amused that religious fervor is outside the bounds of science for this article; I know … Continue reading

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Recreational Geophysics (winter edition)

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When hunting for snowshoes in the equipment room, I discovered snowboards and skis. I am now utterly enchanted by the concept of a downhill geophysical survey. If we blend in some techniques from urban skiing in small town British Columbia, … Continue reading

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“I have no good explanation for why a geophysical company has so many teddy bears.” Explanations proffered on social media include: Fashionable cushions for high amplitude seismic testing. “Padding”-ton bears to supplement shock-foam when packing shipments. Hug-providers for when data-processing … Continue reading

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Opening Access to the Royal Society

Earlier this year, it made headlines when the Royal Society opened its archives of historic, interesting, and sometimes just downright strange articles. The quieter story is the two men who made this happen, as related to me by the ever-informative … Continue reading

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Volcanism on the Sea-to-Sky Highway

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The Sea-to-Sky between Vancouver and Whistler showcases some gorgeous geology. Volcanics cut into fjords by glaciers lead to epic landslide hazards (and equally epic mitigation measures), but north of Squamish the terrain is a bit less harsh and the lava … Continue reading

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