Tag Archives: landslide

Hazard, Risk, and the Steelhead Landslide.

The Oso, Washington landslide was predicted and preventable, and that doesn’t matter. Journalists, stop snarking about how they never should have built there — you live somewhere risky and are apparently clueless about it. Geologists, the community listened to their … Continue reading

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1929 Grand Banks, Newfoundland earthquake

Following an earthquake in 1929 in the Grand Banks area, south of Newfoundland, 12 Atlantic submarine cables were broken in at least 23 places over a period of 12 hours. The breaks occurred progressively in a southward direction. The times … Continue reading

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Book Review: Vancouver, City on the Edge

I have given away more copies of Vancouver, City on the Edge: living with a dynamic geological landscape by John Clague and Bob Turner than I can easily count. I do this because it’s a well-written book accessible to anyone … Continue reading

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Predicting Landslides

This post continues on The Trouble With Landslides by investigating in more detail why predicting how landslides will behave is challenging. Small landslides are fairly easy to predict: rockfalls essentially follow trajectories that can be predicted with relatively straightforward physics, … Continue reading

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The Trouble with Landslides

Landslides are among the least sexy disasters. Mud and rocks are less photogenic than lava, a single event usually impacts fewer people than an earthquake, hurricane, or tsunami, and anyone who lives in big, flat places will probably never encounter … Continue reading

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Hazard Mitigation

The first stage of hazard management is to identify the hazards. When a hazard is identified, models are used to establish the likely extent, intensity, and frequency of events to create a hazard map. The hazard map is used in … Continue reading

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Disaster History of British Columbia

Earthquakes The active subduction zone along the west coast of British Columbia is responsible for most of the ≈1,450 earthquakes each year in Canada, and most of the highest-magnitude events. In the 19th and 20th centuries, western Canada experienced eleven … Continue reading

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F.A.Q. Landslide Runout Analysis

Although I’ve found a surprising number of landslide-bloggers (my favourite is Dave’s), google searches on the DAN-W and DAN3D software packages seem to drop people here. I’m fairly regularly getting comments asking how to go about modeling particular landslides, or … Continue reading

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That’s not a flowslide, it’s a sad red troll!

There’s a problem with landslides. Okay, there are many problems with landslides, and I’m sure many would count “annual odds of death by landslide are one in a million” as a significant problem, but that’s not the one I’m tackling … Continue reading

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