Tag Archives: risk

Hazard, Risk, and the Steelhead Landslide.

The Oso, Washington landslide was predicted and preventable, and that doesn’t matter. Journalists, stop snarking about how they never should have built there — you live somewhere risky and are apparently clueless about it. Geologists, the community listened to their … Continue reading

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GPDRR 2011: Wednesday

I once again spent most of the day loitering around the IGNITE stage, although I did duck over into the building next door for the roundtable on the relationship between science and practice. My highlights: FREEMAN System FREEMAN is the … Continue reading

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GPDRR 2011: Tuesday

The official highlights page (videos) for the Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction conference in Geneva covers almost none of the material I scribbled in my notebook. From the IGNITE stage, my go-to destination when I’m between events, I had … Continue reading

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Lion’s Bay, British Columbia

This gallery contains 3 photos.

British Columbia has a lot of young mountains, and a lot of rain. The combination (with the help of omnipresent gravity) results in significant landslides on a regular basis. In the fjords, the only relatively flat ground (and thus where … Continue reading

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Tsunami on the West Coast

The two main tectonic regions of the west coast of North America are the transverse fault zone area of California, and the subduction zone of the Pacific Northwest (Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia). The two zones have very different seismic … Continue reading

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An Introduction to Tsunami

The 11 March 2011 earthquake near Honshu, Japan triggered a tsunami that spread across the Pacific Ocean. The tsunami arrived an hour before I gave the first tsunami lecture for the Natural Catastrophes class. In that context, it seems an … Continue reading

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Predicting Landslides

This post continues on The Trouble With Landslides by investigating in more detail why predicting how landslides will behave is challenging. Small landslides are fairly easy to predict: rockfalls essentially follow trajectories that can be predicted with relatively straightforward physics, … Continue reading

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The Trouble with Landslides

Landslides are among the least sexy disasters. Mud and rocks are less photogenic than lava, a single event usually impacts fewer people than an earthquake, hurricane, or tsunami, and anyone who lives in big, flat places will probably never encounter … Continue reading

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Natural Hazards in southern British Columbia

The interaction of strong north-south geomorphic obstructions and a low population density dominate the risk assessment for British Columbia. The north-south mountain ranges and valleys place severe limitations on where transportation and other infrastructure may be built. The limited economic … Continue reading

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Transportation Cooridors in British Columbia

Low population density in British Columbia, with populations clustering along the southern border, and strong geomorphic north-south obstructions conspire to limit transportation and communication corridors. The corridors are often multi-purpose with rail, roads, telecommunications, and pipelines in close proximity, and … Continue reading

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