Tag Archives: British Columbia

Science at YVR: US departures terminal

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The United States departure terminal at Vancouver International Airport is not nearly as scientifically interesting as the international terminal. About all we’ve got is a Science World storefront where you can peruse books on local geoscience and play with science-toys, … Continue reading

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Geoscience at YVR: International Departures terminal

The Vancouver airport international departures terminal between Gates 60 to 70 features more relaxing-for-an-airport geoscience than any other airport I’ve visited. A 60 m freshwater river terminates at the base of a 114,000 L saltwater aquarium of approximately 850 sea … Continue reading

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Cathedral Mountain, British Columbia

This is a site description from the 2010 geoNatHaz field school. A small glacier on Cathedral Mountain produces pools of water on its surface, resulting in j√∂kulhlaups (glacial outburst floods) of 10,000 to 24,000 cubic meters of water mobilizing debris … Continue reading

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Lion’s Bay, British Columbia

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British Columbia has a lot of young mountains, and a lot of rain. The combination (with the help of omnipresent gravity) results in significant landslides on a regular basis. In the fjords, the only relatively flat ground (and thus where … Continue reading

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Kicking Horse Pass, British Columbia-Alberta Border

This is a site description from the 2010 geoNatHaz field school. The Kicking Horse Canyon is composed of folded, soft calcareous shale and limestone cut by the Kicking Horse River. Over $972 million has been dedicated to improving Highway 1 … Continue reading

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Rogers Pass, British Columbia

This is a site description from the 2010 geoNatHaz field school. Rogers Pass traverses the Selkirk Mountains at 1330 m above sea level, surrounded by summits reaching nearly 3,440 m above sea level. The region receives an average of 10 … Continue reading

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Workshop: Mapping Unstable Ground

I spent Friday at the Mapping Unstable Ground workshop, an experiment in getting local professionals in one place talking about the landslide hazard of British Columbia. The day was split into a series of talks with plenty of unstructured time … Continue reading

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CKNW: The World Today Weekend with Sean Leslie

If you’re looking for more information from the interview on The World Today Weekend with Sean Leslie, you may want to read the press release from the International Pacific Research Center about tsunami debris distribution over time (Hawaii within 2 … Continue reading

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Tsunami on the West Coast

The two main tectonic regions of the west coast of North America are the transverse fault zone area of California, and the subduction zone of the Pacific Northwest (Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia). The two zones have very different seismic … Continue reading

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The Trouble with Landslides

Landslides are among the least sexy disasters. Mud and rocks are less photogenic than lava, a single event usually impacts fewer people than an earthquake, hurricane, or tsunami, and anyone who lives in big, flat places will probably never encounter … Continue reading

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